2000 Star Struck Catalog

Star Struck was a company that sold fan merchandise via catalogs and on Web 1.0 in the years before and after Y2K. They started up in the nineties, and at some point in the ensuing decade, they merged with another retailer called Pro Team and faded out of sight. Star Struck emphasized marketing of official minor league baseball gear, especially New Era caps. Though they also sold a ton of pro sports gear, according to this article, the minors were a major part of their business.

I first got my hands on a Star Struck catalog in 1998, and it was a crucial moment in the evolution of my minor league fandom. I ordered a Beloit Snappers fitted cap from them that summer and included in the box was a poster featuring the caps of all 160 minor league teams. I still have that poster, but I have never found that catalog. I hope to someday either find that original copy or get another copy of the ’98 catalog. From time to time, I do some internet searching, but thus far, no copies have come up for sale.

In one search, however, I came across an imgur post where someone uploaded photos of every page of the 2000 Star Struck catalog. I had never seen the 2000 catalog. Since I ordered a cap in ’98, they sent another catalog in 1999. When I got that new ’99 catalog, I remember that I was mostly struck by the bounty of PDC changes and the existence of the Louisville RiverBats. I didn’t pay too much attention. That summer I was too busy quoting Austin Powers and rocking out to Santana and Rob Thomas. I didn’t order anything that year, and I guess that’s why I never got this 2000 edition.

Here’s a link to the original imgur post if you’d like to see every page of the catalog. I grabbed images of the first half of the catalog–the part that focused on the minor league teams–and added some MLG thoughts. Enjoy.

 

1

Despite specializing in the minors, there is not a hint of them on the front cover.

 

2

When I bought my Snappers cap in ’98, I used that same sizing guide. I failed and the cap was way too tight for my head.

Interesting anecdote in the intro about their factoid consultants–sounds like they had Miles Wolff on line one.

 

 

3

The Double-A Round Rock Express were new in 2000, and Nolan Ryan was putting in some marketing leg work. I’ve never seen the MiLB logo look that way.

 

 

4

Oh, how I was tempted to buy one of those shirts as a kid. They pop up on eBay from time to time.

 

 

5

Ryan took a break from Advil to promote the Express.

 

 

6

Alright! My old catalogs from the 90s used this parent club-and-affiliates template as well, even if it wasn’t as stylishly formatted. One particular notable difference is that all the caps were digital images in the ’98 catalogs, while these are a mix of digital and photos of the actual caps. One formatting error throughout the catalog is that the Rookie level teams are under the “Single-A” banner.

Lots of info on these pages in a pre-Wikipedia era. You can learn the league, level, state, stadium…even stadium capacity. The “Did You Know” factoids (thanks to Baseball America and the Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball) are fun as well.

The most notable thing here on the Angels page is the SeaWolves’ bizarre branding from the early aughts. Also weird that Erie was an Anaheim affiliate–that was a brief stint between the Pirates and Tigers.

 

 

7

That South Bend batting practice cap logo would later become their primary.

 

 

8

I love that old Myrtle Beach look. They were a fresh identity in those days.

 

 

9

The only thing more boring than the Orioles’ consistent farm system is the “Did You Know” fact shown here.

 

 

91

The first appearances of both Gordy the Gecko and the wacky Lowell tornado!

 

 

92

The Emeralds are a Cubs affiliate these days, but I had no idea the two were linked up from 1999-2000 as well.

 

 

93

I miss that Charlotte look. They kept it till opening the new stadium in 2014. I like that Barons alternate with the old tyme ballplayer, and that Burlington B cap is pretty cool.

 

 

94

First time seeing that alternate RiverBat logo! First year of the Dragons! Two Midwest League teams! Billings with the weird cartoon horse! Good stuff.

 

 

95

Gotta love that Bisons throwback cap. Also cool to see the old RedStixx fox.

 

 

96

I’m curious about the Salem Avalanche BP cap–guessing it’s the elusive lowercase a.

 

 

97

Yes! The short-lived weird anthropomorphic Whitecaps logo. This was the precursor to the wave they wear today.

 

 

98

Love those gray alternates for the two marine mammal teams.

 

 

99

There are a couple things of interest here. I’ve only seen that Zephyrs Mardi Gras alternate once before, and I’ve never seen the BP cap logos for both New Orleans and Auburn.

 

 

991

Here’s a snapshot of the short-lived Golden Spikes, plus a brown-bill alt cap for the Wranglers.

 

 

992

Another wacky one-off with that Dukes BP logo. Some notable newbies with the Stampede going from brown to Dodger blue and the Bears introducing the chocolate bruin.

 

 

993

Few interesting things here: Helena Y2K cap, the short-lived Mudville 9, the Snappers making the transition from mostly blue to green/gold.

 

 

994

First time seeing that Buzz alternate B.

 

 

995

Classic Expos lineup from those days. I never tire of seeing that Vermont curlicue V.

 

 

996

First time seeing that Norfolk BP cap. The Binghamton M cap was worn by players in the 2000 team-issued card set.

 

 

997

That Columbus steering wheel logo is cool, but I’m guessing it was a one-off.

 

 

998

The birth of the River Cats. I still think of them as being a “new” 21st century team, but it’s kind of crazy how they haven’t altered their brand much at all in twenty years.

 

 

999

Last year of the Boll Weevils before Dale Earnhardt joined in and they were renamed the Intimidators.

 

 

9991

That Lynchburg L-of-bats is kinda cool.

 

 

9992

Nothing very interesting here. Skylands Park held 4,341 seats. Neat.

 

 

9993

Some interesting stuff here. This is the only place I’ve seen that “home” cap for the BayBears. The Quakes’ Tremor logo is much easier to see on the road cap than the green-on-teal in ’98. The biggest surprise to me is that Idaho Falls BP cap with a friar sitting on the state of Idaho and flashing a little leg. That’s…something.

 

 

9994

The Fresno alt with the F formed by claw marks is neat. I wish we could see the Volcanoes’ mystery BP cap.

 

 

9995

The Everett alt with the frog licking the E is unique. In another ten years, it would be replaced by the sideways trident E.

 

 

9996

A classic early-day Devil Ray lineup. The deeply weird Orlando Rays had already been mostly green, a few years before Tampa followed suit. That St. Pete BP cap is interesting.

 

 

9997

Odd alternate for Tulsa. That rough-looking Savannah BP logo presaged the currently-popular practice of taking a chunk of a logo and blowing it up bigger.

 

 

9998

This was the first year that the Smokies went from “Knoxville” to “Tennessee,” but the home cap is not labeled new since they kept the same logo for the transition time. This is part of why I consider both Smokies to be the same identity.

 

 

 

Alright. That’s the 2000 Star Struck catalog. Or at least the first half of the catalog–the part with the minor leagues. Though this find was not as nostalgic as getting my hands on a ’98 edition, it was still a treasure trove of minor league ephemera. Now I need to alter some DIA entries and such to include these wacky little details. I mean, how else will the world be exposed to important things that have been lost to the sands of time?

 

idaho falls

 

 

Till next time.

 

 

 

 

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